Batteries falling from Space Station to crash on Earth today, It weighs 2.6 tons
Anjali Raj / Jaano Junction

Batteries falling from Space Station to crash on Earth today, It weighs 2.6 tons

The batteries will undergo a natural reentry into Earth's upper atmosphere, where they are expected to deteriorate and burn up. The batteries have a mass of 2.6 metric tonnes.

Nine batteries released from the International Space Station on January 11, 2021, are set to crash on Earth on Friday.

"Most of it may burn up during the reentry. While some parts may reach the ground, the casualty risk – the likelihood of a person being hit – is very low," the European Space Agency, said in a statement.

The Space Debris and Independent Safety Offices of the European Space Agency are closely monitoring the reentry of a pallet of used ISS batteries and calculating estimates for when and where the reentry will occur.

"The reentry will occur between -51.6 degrees South and 51.6 degrees North. Large uncertainties, primarily driven by fluctuating levels of atmospheric drag, prevent more precise predictions at this time. The closer we get to the expected reentry window, the better the concerned region can be geographically constrained," ESA added.

As the object goes through atmospheric entry, it encounters air resistance and friction as it travels through the Earth's atmosphere.

Also Read
Chandrayaan-4's objective revealed: Here's what it will do on the Moon
Batteries falling from Space Station to crash on Earth today, It weighs 2.6 tons

Some debris may break apart or fragment during entry due to the intense thermal stress and mechanical forces experienced. This fragmentation can result in multiple glowing pieces visible in the sky.

Source: India Today

Stay connected to Jaano Junction on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Koo. Listen to our Podcast on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

Related Stories

No stories found.
logo
Jaano Junction
www.jaanojunction.com